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Sample the Skeptic's Dictionary

science-based medicine

"It's become politically correct to investigate nonsense." --R. Barker Bausell

Science-based medicine (SBM) evaluates health claims, practices, and products by the best scientific evidence available.* Central to the idea of science-based and contrasting with evidence-based medicine is the notion that science exists as an interdependent network of theories, knowledge, and laws. Evidence-based medicine (EBM) considers as scientific evidence any results from a clinical trial (and subsequent meta-analyses and systematic reviews of clinical trials), regardless of whether that clinical trial was grounded in scientific plausibility. The authors of the SBM blog put it this way: >>more

sample Mysteries and Science (for kids 9 and up)

acupuncture

In a nutshell: Acupuncture is a kind of energy medicine. Needles are stuck into various parts of the body to unblock energy and bring back a balance of yin-yang. There is no scientific evidence for this energy or yin-yang.

Acupuncture is the puncturing of the skin with sharp needles to unclog an invisible energy that some people think runs through everything in the universe.>>more

a blast from the past

What if Dean Radin is right? 

by Robert Todd Carroll 

Dean Radin, author of The Conscious Universe: The Scientific Truth of Psychic Phenomena (HarperSanFrancisco 1997), says that "psi researchers have resolved a century of skeptical doubts through thousands of replicated laboratory studies" (289) regarding the reality of psychic phenomena such as ESP (extrasensory perception) and PK (psychokinesis). Of course, Radin also considers meta-analysis as the most widely accepted method of measuring replication in science (51). Few scientists would agree with either of these claims. In any case, most American adults—about 75%, according to a 2005 Gallup poll—believe in at least one paranormal phenomenon. Forty-one percent believe in ESP. Fifty-five percent believe in the power of the mind to heal the body. One doesn't need to be psychic to know that the majority of believers in psi have come to their beliefs through experience or anecdotes, rather than through studying the scientific evidence Radin puts forth in his book.>>more

 

 

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